Subsaharan Africa

This area stretches west to east

from the Cape Verde islands on the Atlantic to the Horn of Africa on the Indian Ocean’s shore, and north to south from the Upper Nile and the Sahara desert to the Cape of Good Hope on Africa’s tip, where the Atlantic and Indian oceans meet. The Sahel zone is an arid corridor south of the Sahara that extends to the Nile valley and the highlands of Ethiopia to the east. Beyond is the parched Horn of Africa and the Indian Ocean.

West and Central Africa are wet tropical areas. The Cape area featuresa pleasant, Mediterranean-type climate.

European colonization began in the 17th century on the Cape and certain coastal ports. Arab influence was important in East Africa. In the 19th century, Sub-Saharan Africa, with the exception of Ethiopia, was parceled into colonies by the European powers. Rushed decolonization took place in the 1960s.

Africa is a continent of rich ethnic and religious variety. The boundaries of the present states were drawn by foreign powers and do not reflect indigenous territorial and ethnic structures. Such aspects did not inform the colonization and decolonization process. Later on, the outside powers, the United Nations in particular, cemented the existence of these arbitrarily designed states. This legacy is at the root of the tragedy of the Democratic Republic of Congo, for instance. The western-style governance systems left by the colonial powers also do not help the Africans. Such systems ought to be derived from the local needs instead of forcing them into an alien institutional corset. Africa needs to resolve its governance challenge by itself. 

This legacy is Africa’s tragedy. Even so, the continent has a wealth of natural resources. Not the least is its population. Africa’s high fertility rate is not a curse, as many like to proclaim, but a source of strength in a world whose overall population is about to decline.  

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See our reports on Subsaharan Africa

  • Report
  • Scenarios

Mediation helps start a fragile transition in Sudan

The fall of President Omar al-Bashir in Sudan can be seen as the demise of just another African strongman. Yet in a large state divided along complex ethnic, religious and political lines, his personalized tyranny made political stability possible. Now that is gone and an internationally mediated transition agreement is in place. Yet tensions between the civilian opposition, the military and various regional players suggest that the road ahead may not lead to democracy.

Teresa Nogueira Pinto
  • Report
  • Scenarios

South Africa lurches toward uncompensated land seizures

The politically explosive land question has been revived in South Africa at an awkward moment. A motion by the Marxist-Leninist opposition to allow farmland to be expropriated without compensation hit the ruling African National Congress (ANC) as it was beset by corruption scandals, a slumping economy, and widespread voter disillusionment with the vision of a “rainbow” society. Racialized land seizures may serve as a brief political diversion, but as the case of Zimbabwe shows, it will only make the underlying problems worse.

Teresa Nogueira Pinto
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Nigeria’s cautious leader faces hard choices

The first-term record of Muhammadu Buhari, reelected as president of Nigeria earlier this year, was mixed at best. He made modest headway in curbing corruption and the activities of the Boko Haram terror group, but his statist approach to ruling has not been helpful in Africa’s most populous country, where economic growth lags behind demographic trends. If Nigeria’s ruling class does not find ways to unleash the oil-producing nation’s vast economic potential, political instability there will only increase.

Teresa Nogueira Pinto
  • Report
  • Scenarios

Mozambique: The biggest corruption case in Africa

A $2 billion corruption scandal continues to upend the political and economic landscape in Mozambique. Manuel Chang, the former finance minister, has been arrested by U.S. authorities along with several co-conspirators. His legal fate, which now hangs in the balance in South Africa, will have major repercussions in his home country. Extradition to the U.S. could implicate other Mozambican officials and help turn back on the flow of international aid and investment.

Anonymous GIS Expert